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Title: Reproduction Paintings
  Southern Song Dynasty, Fan Kuan ''Travelers Among Mountains and Streams''  
 

Fan Kuan (10th century) was a native of Hua-yuan (modern Yao-hsien) in Shensi province. During the Northern Song dynasty, the characteristic painting style was of a central mountain dominating the scene.The clusters of vegetation at the top of the tall mountain here are actually distant forests clinging to a precarious perches. Running along the central axis of the scroll, the central mountain dominates the scene in a classic example of Northern Song monumental landscape painting. The rooftops of a building complex stand out in the right middleground. By the cluster of rocks in the right foreground is a path on which a mule train makes its way. A cascade as slender as silk falls from the heights above, culminating in the stream rushing down in eddies towards the foreground. From near to far, Fan Kuan has described with realistic detail the solemn grandeur of a majestic landscape. Fan Kuan rendered the mountains and slopes with jagged outline strokes and filled them with brush dabs resembling raindrops--techniques that highlight the monumental and eternal features of the mountains. To the right of the mule train, among the leaves, is the signature of Fan Kuan, a final touch by an artist to epitomize the insignificance of humans (including himself) compared to Nature.

 
  Southern Song Dynasty, Fan Kuan ''Travelers Among Mountains and Streams''   Southern Song Dynasty, Fan Kuan ''Travelers Among Mountains and Streams''  
 
Southern Song Dynasty, Fan Kuan ''Travelers Among Mountains and Streams''
     
 
Yuan Dynasty, Huang Gongwang ''Huang Gongwang's ''Dwelling in the Fuchun Mountains''
 
 

"Dwelling in the Fuchun Mountains", a long handscroll painting done by Huang Gongwang between the ages of 80 and 82 by Chinese reckoning, depicts landscape in the area around the Fuchun River where he was traveling and residing. From right to left, the scroll follows the riverbank as hills and mountains rise and fall repeatedly with lush and dense trees. The scenery is sometimes deep and remote and at other times clear and expansive. The scroll throughout is rendered in a "sketching-ideas" type of freehand brushwork using monochrome ink. The application of the brush is quite calligraphic, at times gentle and serene, while at others free and untrammeled. The ink tones are rich and varied in the texturing and washes, tracing back to the simple and innocent style of Dong Yuan and Juran in the Five Dynasties and inspiring a tradition of literati painting in the following Ming and Qing dynasties.

 
  Yuan Dynasty, Huang Gongwang ''Huang Gongwang's ''Dwelling in the Fuchun Mountains''  
 
Yuan Dynasty, Huang Gongwang ''Huang Gongwang's ''Dwelling in the Fuchun Mountains''
 
Yuan Dynasty, Huang Gongwang ''Huang Gongwang's ''Dwelling in the Fuchun Mountains''
     
 
Chin Dynasty, Wang Hsi-chih ''Timely Clearing After Snowfall''
 
 

Wang Xizhi, whose ancestors were from Lin-i in Shandong, was known more for excelling at regular, running, and cursive script calligraphy, studying their features in depth to create an elegant style of unparalleled beauty, which is why later generations referred to him as the ''Sage of Calligraphy.'' This work bearing the writer's and recipient's names at the front and end are done with steady brushwork throughout, forming characters of exceptional beauty. Judging from the seals and inscriptions and the work's documented history, it can be deduced that this is a fine copy from the Tang dynasty.

 
  Chin Dynasty, Wang Hsi-chih ''Timely Clearing After Snowfall''   Chin Dynasty, Wang Hsi-chih ''Timely Clearing After Snowfall''  
     
 
Tang Dynasty, anonymous ''A Palace Concert''
 
 

Tang Dynasty, anonymous ''A Palace Concert'' This painting shows ten ladies of the inner court sitting around a large rectangular table; some drinking tea, others ordering drinks. The four figures at the far end seem to be responsible for playing music and livening up the atmosphere. The instruments that they hold, from left to right, are bamboo pipes, zither, lute, and flute and servant girls play a clapper to keep beat. In this painting, the ladies' plump bodies, hairstyles and clothes, complexion, and the painting style all correlate to the late Tang dynasty.

 
  Tang Dynasty, anonymous ''A Palace Concert''   Tang Dynasty, anonymous ''A Palace Concert''  
     
 
Song Dynasty, Kuo Hsi ''Early Spring''
 
 

This work, done in 1072, is Kuo's most famous masterpiece. He entitled it ''Early Spring,'' and, accordingly, auspicious clouds on an early spring day appear enveloping the landscape after just having emerged from winter--full of potential for life and renewal. Suggested by forms emerging from the mist, the land seems to awaken as the trees spring forth. Kuo Hsi arranged the main elements of the monumental landscape along the central axis of this vertical scroll. Large landforms and pine trees in the foreground connect with the ''S''-shape of the middle ground. Following a break with the mist, the slope climbs up and continues into the winding central mountain in the back. Deep distance penetrates to either side of the mighty mountain as winding forms are complemented by the diagonal breaks of streams and waterfalls. Lofty halls and pavilions along with a thatched-roof kiosk are tucked deep in the mountains to the right. The flat distance to the left creates an expansive horizontal vista that complements the dizzying heights of the mountains. The ink is light yet rich, while the composition combines the techniques of tall, deep, and flat distances, making this an ideal landscape for walking, viewing, living, and traveling in the imagination.

 
  Song Dynasty, Kuo Hsi ''Early Spring''   Song Dynasty, Kuo Hsi ''Early Spring''  
 
Song Dynasty, Kuo Hsi ''Early Spring''
     
     

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